Saturday, December 31, 2005

Justice Department Looks into Leaks

And it's about time. The US Justice Department has just announced that it will investigate NSAGate and the leaking of the covert CIA programs. Personally, I don't think these leaks hurt US intelligence gathering operations, as I have mentioned previously.

But it's high time to burn some traiterous liberals at the stake and put the MSM back where it should be - on our side.

Already AP is signalling that it wants Attorney-General Gonzales out of the picture:
It is unclear whether Attorney General Alberto Gonzales will recuse himself from the inquiry. He was White House counsel when Bush signed the executive order authorizing the NSA, which is normally confined to overseas operations, to spy on conversations taking place on American soil.
And the usual suspects have lined up against the investigation:
  1. The ACLU:
    "It's pretty stunning that, rather than focus on whether the president broke his oath of office and broke federal law, they are going after the whistleblowers," said Anthony D. Romero, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

  2. Academia:
    Duke University law professor Scott Silliman agreed that the Justice Department is taking the wrong approach.

    "Somebody in the government has enough concern about this program that they are talking to reporters," Silliman said. "I don't think that is something the Justice Department should try to prosecute."

  3. The MSM:
    Administration officials insisted that Bush has the power to conduct warrantless surveillance under the Constitution's war powers provision. They argued that Congress also gave Bush the power when it authorized the use of military force against terrorists in a resolution adopted within days of the Sept. 11 attacks.
Notice that the last quote does not state that the President of the United States can effectively suspend the Constitution as Abraham Lincoln had done and so his executive orders are within established precedence, nor that even liberal law professors profess the legality of NSA covert operations, nor that senior members of Congress were kept well-informed about the NSA's covert operations.

Compare this response to that of PlameGate, where Lying Wilson demanded to see Karl Rove being frogmarched out of the Whitehouse. Now, it remains to be seen if this same chap current NSA/CIA analysts/employees being frogmarched out of Langley or Fort Meade.

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Manny Is Here: Justice Department Looks into Leaks

Saturday, December 31, 2005

Justice Department Looks into Leaks

And it's about time. The US Justice Department has just announced that it will investigate NSAGate and the leaking of the covert CIA programs. Personally, I don't think these leaks hurt US intelligence gathering operations, as I have mentioned previously.

But it's high time to burn some traiterous liberals at the stake and put the MSM back where it should be - on our side.

Already AP is signalling that it wants Attorney-General Gonzales out of the picture:
It is unclear whether Attorney General Alberto Gonzales will recuse himself from the inquiry. He was White House counsel when Bush signed the executive order authorizing the NSA, which is normally confined to overseas operations, to spy on conversations taking place on American soil.
And the usual suspects have lined up against the investigation:
  1. The ACLU:
    "It's pretty stunning that, rather than focus on whether the president broke his oath of office and broke federal law, they are going after the whistleblowers," said Anthony D. Romero, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

  2. Academia:
    Duke University law professor Scott Silliman agreed that the Justice Department is taking the wrong approach.

    "Somebody in the government has enough concern about this program that they are talking to reporters," Silliman said. "I don't think that is something the Justice Department should try to prosecute."

  3. The MSM:
    Administration officials insisted that Bush has the power to conduct warrantless surveillance under the Constitution's war powers provision. They argued that Congress also gave Bush the power when it authorized the use of military force against terrorists in a resolution adopted within days of the Sept. 11 attacks.
Notice that the last quote does not state that the President of the United States can effectively suspend the Constitution as Abraham Lincoln had done and so his executive orders are within established precedence, nor that even liberal law professors profess the legality of NSA covert operations, nor that senior members of Congress were kept well-informed about the NSA's covert operations.

Compare this response to that of PlameGate, where Lying Wilson demanded to see Karl Rove being frogmarched out of the Whitehouse. Now, it remains to be seen if this same chap current NSA/CIA analysts/employees being frogmarched out of Langley or Fort Meade.

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