Tuesday, January 31, 2006

Necessity of the Moral Law

C.S. Lewis spoke for its necessity and was ignored in the 1940s.

Nietzsche, the son of a pastor and grandson of two pastors, spoke against it, but honestly understood the ramifications of his position:
God has died philosophically in the nineteenth century. The concept of God can no longer withstand the philosopher's blade. And God is bleeding, God is dead. (But now that) God has died two things will happen in the twentieth century:
  1. The twentieth century will become the bloodiest century in history
  2. A universal madness would break out.
Furthermore, he personifies himself as a madman and says this:
Have you not heard of that madman, who lit a lantern in the bright morning hours, ran to the market place and cried incessantly, "I'm looking for God! I'm looking for God!". As many of those who did not believe in God were standing together there, he excited considerable laughter. "Have you lost him then?", said one, "Did he lose his way like a child?", said another, "Or is he hiding?". "Is he afraid of us, has he gone on a voyage or emigrated?". Thus they shouted and shouted and laughed him to scorn.

But the madman sprang into their midst and pierced them with his glances. "Where is God?", he cried. "I'll tell you! We have killed him, you and I, we are all his murders. But how have we done this? How were we able to drink up the sea? Who gave us a sponge to wipe away the entire horizon? What did we do when we unchained this earth from the sun? Whither is it moving now? Whither are we moving now? Away from all suns maybe? Are we not perpetually falling backwards, sidewards and in all directions? Is there any up or down left? Are we not straying through an infinite nothing? Do we not feel the breath of empty space? Has it not become colder? Is not more and more night coming on us all the time? Musn't not light lanterns be lit in the morning? Do we not hear anything of the gravediggers who are burying God? Do we not smell anything of God's decomposition? Gods decompose too you know! And God is dead. He remains dead, and we have killed him!
Aldous Huxley on why he discarded the Moral Law:
I wanted to believe the Darwinian idea. I chose to believe it, not because I think that there was enormous evidence for it. Nor because I believed that it had the power to give full interpretation to my origin. I chose to believe it, because it delivered me from trying to find meaning and freed me to pursue my own erotic passions.
Ravi Zacharias argues that the absence of the Moral Law has some "enormous manifestations in the Western world today":
I'll say this as kindly as I can: the last 22 years of my life have been spent in the West. The equal amount in the beginning was spent in the East. And Western civilisation is being rocked to its foundations because Western man does not know the point of reference for the value system that he wants to espouse right now. See the Middle East still espouses Islam: there is some transcedent leverage to the culture. We in modern times are daring the lines in the West and we actually think we can survive without the espousing of a Moral Law. History cries out against the experiment.
This is most clearly and visually apparent in the trembling knees of Western institutions now, as we oppose the "transcendant leverage" provided by Islam in the Middle East.

Let's hope and prayer that a restoration and rebelief in the Moral Law held so dear in the West prevents something far worse taking place.

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Manny Is Here: Necessity of the Moral Law

Tuesday, January 31, 2006

Necessity of the Moral Law

C.S. Lewis spoke for its necessity and was ignored in the 1940s.

Nietzsche, the son of a pastor and grandson of two pastors, spoke against it, but honestly understood the ramifications of his position:
God has died philosophically in the nineteenth century. The concept of God can no longer withstand the philosopher's blade. And God is bleeding, God is dead. (But now that) God has died two things will happen in the twentieth century:
  1. The twentieth century will become the bloodiest century in history
  2. A universal madness would break out.
Furthermore, he personifies himself as a madman and says this:
Have you not heard of that madman, who lit a lantern in the bright morning hours, ran to the market place and cried incessantly, "I'm looking for God! I'm looking for God!". As many of those who did not believe in God were standing together there, he excited considerable laughter. "Have you lost him then?", said one, "Did he lose his way like a child?", said another, "Or is he hiding?". "Is he afraid of us, has he gone on a voyage or emigrated?". Thus they shouted and shouted and laughed him to scorn.

But the madman sprang into their midst and pierced them with his glances. "Where is God?", he cried. "I'll tell you! We have killed him, you and I, we are all his murders. But how have we done this? How were we able to drink up the sea? Who gave us a sponge to wipe away the entire horizon? What did we do when we unchained this earth from the sun? Whither is it moving now? Whither are we moving now? Away from all suns maybe? Are we not perpetually falling backwards, sidewards and in all directions? Is there any up or down left? Are we not straying through an infinite nothing? Do we not feel the breath of empty space? Has it not become colder? Is not more and more night coming on us all the time? Musn't not light lanterns be lit in the morning? Do we not hear anything of the gravediggers who are burying God? Do we not smell anything of God's decomposition? Gods decompose too you know! And God is dead. He remains dead, and we have killed him!
Aldous Huxley on why he discarded the Moral Law:
I wanted to believe the Darwinian idea. I chose to believe it, not because I think that there was enormous evidence for it. Nor because I believed that it had the power to give full interpretation to my origin. I chose to believe it, because it delivered me from trying to find meaning and freed me to pursue my own erotic passions.
Ravi Zacharias argues that the absence of the Moral Law has some "enormous manifestations in the Western world today":
I'll say this as kindly as I can: the last 22 years of my life have been spent in the West. The equal amount in the beginning was spent in the East. And Western civilisation is being rocked to its foundations because Western man does not know the point of reference for the value system that he wants to espouse right now. See the Middle East still espouses Islam: there is some transcedent leverage to the culture. We in modern times are daring the lines in the West and we actually think we can survive without the espousing of a Moral Law. History cries out against the experiment.
This is most clearly and visually apparent in the trembling knees of Western institutions now, as we oppose the "transcendant leverage" provided by Islam in the Middle East.

Let's hope and prayer that a restoration and rebelief in the Moral Law held so dear in the West prevents something far worse taking place.

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